MENU

                 department of history

 

Matthew Warner Osborn

Assistant Professor
Early America


212 Cockefair Hall
Phone: 816-235-5843
Email: OsbornMW@umkc.edu


Curriculum Vitae

Education

2007 Ph.D., University of California at Davis

2003 M.A., University of California at Davis

1989 B.A., University of California at Santa Cruz

Bio Sketch

A historian of early America, Matthew Warner Osborn received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Davis. Prior to joining the UMKC history department in 2011, he taught at Occidental College in Los Angeles, CA. His research interests include medicine and disease; alcohol, drugs, and addiction; popular and literary culture; urban history; and social inequality. His first book, Rum Maniacs: Alcoholic Insanity in the Early American Republic, looks at how delirium tremens shaped our modern conceptions of alcoholism. He is currently researching early American theater and popular culture, looking specifically at the Night Hawk, a fanciful character who appeared in a labor newspaper in the 1820s.

Courses for Fall 2011

> HIST 101  American History to 1877

> HIST 302  America, 1000-1763: The Formative Era

> HIST 5502  America, 1000-1763: The Formative Era (graduate course)

Publications

Books

Rum Maniacs: Alcoholic Insanity in the Early American Republic (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2014)

Articles

“A Detestable Shrine: Alcohol Abuse in Antebellum Philadelphia,” The Journal of the Early Republic 29 (Spring 2009): 101–132.

"Diseased Imaginations: Constructing Delirium Tremens in Philadelphia, 1813–1832” The Social History of Medicine 19 (2006): 191–208.

Grants, Honors & Awards

2006-2007 UC Davis Dissertation Fellowship

2005 Barra Dissertation Fellowship, McNeil Center for Early American Studies

2005 SHEAR Library Resident Research Fellowship, American Philosophical Society

2004 Albert M. Greenfield Foundation Dissertation Fellowship, The Library Company of Philadelphia

2004 Roy Porter Memorial Essay Prize for “Diseased Imaginations: Constructing Delirium Tremens in Philadelphia, 1813-1832,” awarded by the Society for the Social History of Medicine.